9 Comments
Feb 1Liked by Rhyd Wildermuth

Happy Imbolc!

About the song: There is a new, "sanitized" version, which says "let the young folk live, and the old beside them", but I remember that as a kid, we would always sing the old version. (I am from Luxembourg)

It only occured to me recently that it is actually meant in a different way: "Let the old folk die" - the emphasis is on the "let", as in allowing them to die a peaceful death. A good death, as opposed to spending the last part of life suffering.

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Feb 2Liked by Rhyd Wildermuth

Beautiful piece Rhyd! I found it very moving!

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Hi Rhyd,

I never know how to contact a host on Substack, so you can delete this after reading. I go to your video site re/al/lign? on my 13 inch macBook and I just see a bunch of names I do not recognize. Is there some way to squeeze in a subject?

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Feb 2Liked by Rhyd Wildermuth

I find your title "Worlding Into the Earth" an appropriate one for Groundhog Day as well. While the Bill Murray movie connected the holiday to endlessly repeating days, Groundhog Day has a much deeper meaning. I find it a unique tradition that compliments Imbolc, but is still distinctly its own thing.

Once Deitsch (Pennsylvania Dutch) people arrived in North America, the Groundhog replaced the Badger as the prognosticator of the weather (something very important to agricultural people). In parts of Germany Candlemas was known as Badger Day. While they were Christian at the time, various pagan ideas and symbols still survived in the folk culture, even if their original source was forgotten. The scholar Don Yoder once called the groundhog a totemic animal for Deitsch. Groundhogs were considered messengers, as the borrow was seen as a metaphor for various connections between the worlds.

So, Happy Imbolc and Happy Groundhog's Day!

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I don't know if you'd relate, but your description of your relationship with Brigid reminds me of the story "The persistence of vision" by John Varley. He's known for science fiction, but that story is more along the lines of alternate recent history.

Anyway, if you happen to be in the mood for dark humour, you might enjoy (or maybe not enjoy) this:

https://cluelessmagic.wordpress.com/2024/02/02/how-to-kill-a-black-wizard-with-sigils/

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